Ex-Prisoners Talk About the Most Evil People They Encountered Behind Bars

I think going to prison would be the most terrifying experience imaginable.

Being locked up with murderers, rapists, and all kinds of other violent offenders has to do so much damage to a person’s psyche. Let’s hope that all of us (or at least most of us) never have to go through that.

AskReddit users shared their stories from when they did time.

1. Can’t forget it.

“The words “I shot that bitch in the stomach and I hope they both die” were used in reference to a 15 year old pregnant girl.

I won’t ever be able to forget that one.”

2. A simple farm boy.

“When I was in the outbox the day before I was released I was hanging out with a bunch of guys just killing time.

One of them was part of a killing gang. They kidnapped and killed a bunch of people for body parts. And cut them off while the people were alive. It was a pretty gruesome case.

Anyways, he was really quiet and rather stupid. Just a simple farm boy type.”

3. Seemed nice enough…

“English guy here, I spent 4 and a half months in prison in 2018. There was a guy who was really nice, seemed like a genuine guy.

That was until I found out her strangled his drunk wife to death and left her there whilst he went to work the next morning.”

4. The Aurora movie theater shooter.

“Before I got my prison sentence in 2013 I was in Arapahoe County jail with James Holmes. Was pretty crazy cuz they’d put the whole facility on lockdown to move him, Even though he was in segregation.”

5. Not an inmate.

“There was a correctional officer at least 6’5 and well built and he would always come in pissed off. So one morning we are waiting in line for breakfast and he thought he heard this older man call him a bitch. He followed the man back to his cell and started teeing off on him.

The man didn’t even try fighting back and when he fell the first time he split his head open on the steel bunk. The inmate was so out of it he started asking were his car keys and wallet went while he was on the ground bleeding. The C.O. hears the man and for some reason turns around and goes back and hits him a few more times and says “who’s the bitch now…”.

I’ll never forget thinking ‘damn this is somebodies father’.”

6. OH MY GOD.

“One of the women on my wing cut up her lover and put his body parts in an empty TV box, then put the box on his mother’s door step.”

7. This is brutal.

“I was in and out juvy from 15-18 till I went to county jail, the worst people I came into contact was a boy 15 who shot his step mother, slit her throat, beat her head in with a blunt object, wrapped her in sheets for the fathers roommate to find her then he shot him. Happened in McMinnville Oregon. Other than that a lot of people raping siblings, and making threats to shoot up the high schools in the area. That’s Yamhill County for you.

8. Women’s prison.

“I was locked up with Jodi Arias, so that was bizarre.

There was also a woman who murdered her baby and kept it in the freezer. We called her Maytag.”

9. No remorse.

“This rich kid stabbed his friend in the chest, killing him, but he was on Xanax and weed at the time and doesn’t remember anything of it other than his friend on the floor dying, the mad thing is this guy (18 years old) actually got off with the murder and found not guilty although was sent down for just under 2 years for possession of a knife. His parents were quite wealthy and it was a big case in the UK. Basically his barristers were the best money could buy and he said that’s how he got off.

He didnt have any remorse for his actions. Which was made to think made him a pretty fucked up person. It’s a funny one though because he actually seemed a nice guy until he would talk about the killing and just didnt care what he had done. Nobody else in the prison had ever killed anyone to my knowledge, as it was a lower cat prison – but he was only their for possession of an knife.”

10. All kinds of psychos.

“I was incarcerated with over 280 people doing life without parole. There were all kinds- Stabbed the neighbor lady 150+ times, shot a bully in the head in the school parking lot, beat a dude with a hammer, etc.

There were two that stuck with me though- one where he looked me right in the eye and told me about shooting a guy with a shotgun to the chest (creeped me the f out), weirdo that kidnapped and killed some girl in his basement was another. John Wayne Gacy actually designed the miniature golf course there.”

11. 99 to life.

“Was in prison for 27 months. Unfortunately, your child rapists and kiddie porn guys were mixed in to gen pop, so you would get all kinds like that everywhere. The worst one I heard of was when I was in military prison. Details are foggy because this was 13 years ago, but I remember there being a guy who got 99 years for murder.

He had killed a guy, then killed the guys wife because she was home and would have been a witness, but not before raping her first. The whole facility got locked down every time they moved this guy, because they didnt even want the other inmates to see what he looked like.

The other fucked up one was at the same facility. So in the army there’s a thing called turtlefucking, where you hit someone’s kevlar helmet with your kevlar helmet. It makes a loud THONK sound, but doesnt really hurt. People didnt hit super hard, just hard enough to make the noise happen. This guy turtlefucked a girl when she wasnt wearing a kevlar helmet. She ended up dying while the guy was still awaiting his trial, and he went full on cuckoo bananas.”

12. KKK member.

“I had a cellie in prison who was a KKK “white boy.” He was a mad man. He was always pissed off and would say the craziest stuff like “Did you hear that? The “white” rhino is going extinct. Fucking jews.”

I was watching the movie about black pilots in WWII and he sat down indignant and rolled his eyes and guffawed… “Black Pilots!?! C’mon.” I said “You really think there are no black pilots?” He said “Hell no, have you ever seen a black pilot?” It was like this every day until my move finally got approved.”

13. From an officer’s perspective.

“I wasn’t an inmate, I was an officer so my opinion might be disqualified. But at a facility I worked at we were a level 5 which is maximum security. Lots of people who had life without parole and just a bunch of different things happened. One guy was on a documentary because he traveled across several states and killed around 5 people total. He was pissed cause the documentary blamed him but he always tried to say his father hitting him as a child made him kill these people.

Then there’s the old guy who raped his young grandchildren and was furious that he was sent to prison cause they were HIS grandkids so he could do whatever he wanted. He had also raped his children when they were growing up.

Lots of sick things in a max security prison and those would be nothing when compared to a federal supermax.”

14. Sounds like a nightmare.

“Ahh.. theres different degrees to evil.. one of the smallest black guys in there was SO loud and would not stop talking. He eventually freaked out and cut his body up with a razor blade to get medical attention for a different scene.. another guy was young, got beat by a 70 yr. Old in dominoes. The young guy just straight punched the old man in the forehead, I was reading Marley and me, and it just sounded like someone hit a watermelon super hard. I looked up, old man was knocked out on the floor, when he came to, these other 18 yr old kids were cracking up laughing and the old man was sooo confused and kept asking why are you laughing?

A white guy who was small and young was the jack russell terrier of the pod, and he was the worst. He would just constantly steal and for some reason nobody did anything about it. Guy named nick looked just like mike Tyson and would fight white ppl who would work out bc they were doing it wrong..he would also stare at you while you were taking a shit.

There was one corrections officer who assaulted me in a bathroom during work duty bc I didnt know if a roll of toilet paper should be changed out.. there was like a 1/3 left. It was my first day, he thought I was fucking with him. After he hit me and was done, I said Sooooo, does it need to be changed i still dont know. He figured out I was serious and apologized. One CO always snuck me coffee and let me watch football on tv bc I was nice and worked hard.”

15. In the Bronx.

“Was in Spofford Juvenile detention center when I was 13 (not a good age to be there at 4’9 100 lbs) and I was one of two Caucasian’s in the entire place so I mostly kept to myself. I did befriend a kid named Chris Whitehead who showed up with a freshly healed scar about 15-20 inches long in the shape of a C on the side of his head. He didn’t talk much but he ended up telling me how it happened when I finally got the nerve to ask him.

Told me his older brother jumped him into the Crips and since he cried during he took a hot knife and burned it into his head for the disrespect. Then he had his little brother, the same age as me by the way, shoot the first person to cross the street in their neighborhood, who ended up being a young pregnant girl. How he only ended up at Spofford is beyond me but it was disgusting to see such a nice kid end up there because of his older piece of shit brother.

I remember when he went to court he was sure he’d be transferred so he pissed all over his jump suit and stuffed it in the radiator causing all of us in the semi violent block to be moved upstairs with the actual violent criminals (I think the kid I’m referring to was only on mine because of his age). The staff members there gave everyone there permission to beat the living shit out of him when he came back but he never did because he got transferred thankfully because his brother ended up there too and was fully on board with the beat down his brother was going to receive.

Really glad they shut down that place because they were running drugs and a prostitution ring on the female side and the treatment of the kids there was disgusting to say the least.”

Yikes. Prison is no place for this guy, I can tell you that much.

Have you ever spent any time behind bars or maybe a friend or family member did some time?

If so, tell us what it was like in the comments. We’d love to hear about your experiences!

The post Ex-Prisoners Talk About the Most Evil People They Encountered Behind Bars appeared first on UberFacts.

Ex-Prisoners Talk About the Most Evil People They Encountered Behind Bars

I think going to prison would be the most terrifying experience imaginable.

Being locked up with murderers, rapists, and all kinds of other violent offenders has to do so much damage to a person’s psyche. Let’s hope that all of us (or at least most of us) never have to go through that.

AskReddit users shared their stories from when they did time.

1. Can’t forget it.

“The words “I shot that bitch in the stomach and I hope they both die” were used in reference to a 15 year old pregnant girl.

I won’t ever be able to forget that one.”

2. A simple farm boy.

“When I was in the outbox the day before I was released I was hanging out with a bunch of guys just killing time.

One of them was part of a killing gang. They kidnapped and killed a bunch of people for body parts. And cut them off while the people were alive. It was a pretty gruesome case.

Anyways, he was really quiet and rather stupid. Just a simple farm boy type.”

3. Seemed nice enough…

“English guy here, I spent 4 and a half months in prison in 2018. There was a guy who was really nice, seemed like a genuine guy.

That was until I found out her strangled his drunk wife to death and left her there whilst he went to work the next morning.”

4. The Aurora movie theater shooter.

“Before I got my prison sentence in 2013 I was in Arapahoe County jail with James Holmes. Was pretty crazy cuz they’d put the whole facility on lockdown to move him, Even though he was in segregation.”

5. Not an inmate.

“There was a correctional officer at least 6’5 and well built and he would always come in pissed off. So one morning we are waiting in line for breakfast and he thought he heard this older man call him a bitch. He followed the man back to his cell and started teeing off on him.

The man didn’t even try fighting back and when he fell the first time he split his head open on the steel bunk. The inmate was so out of it he started asking were his car keys and wallet went while he was on the ground bleeding. The C.O. hears the man and for some reason turns around and goes back and hits him a few more times and says “who’s the bitch now…”.

I’ll never forget thinking ‘damn this is somebodies father’.”

6. OH MY GOD.

“One of the women on my wing cut up her lover and put his body parts in an empty TV box, then put the box on his mother’s door step.”

7. This is brutal.

“I was in and out juvy from 15-18 till I went to county jail, the worst people I came into contact was a boy 15 who shot his step mother, slit her throat, beat her head in with a blunt object, wrapped her in sheets for the fathers roommate to find her then he shot him. Happened in McMinnville Oregon. Other than that a lot of people raping siblings, and making threats to shoot up the high schools in the area. That’s Yamhill County for you.

8. Women’s prison.

“I was locked up with Jodi Arias, so that was bizarre.

There was also a woman who murdered her baby and kept it in the freezer. We called her Maytag.”

9. No remorse.

“This rich kid stabbed his friend in the chest, killing him, but he was on Xanax and weed at the time and doesn’t remember anything of it other than his friend on the floor dying, the mad thing is this guy (18 years old) actually got off with the murder and found not guilty although was sent down for just under 2 years for possession of a knife. His parents were quite wealthy and it was a big case in the UK. Basically his barristers were the best money could buy and he said that’s how he got off.

He didnt have any remorse for his actions. Which was made to think made him a pretty fucked up person. It’s a funny one though because he actually seemed a nice guy until he would talk about the killing and just didnt care what he had done. Nobody else in the prison had ever killed anyone to my knowledge, as it was a lower cat prison – but he was only their for possession of an knife.”

10. All kinds of psychos.

“I was incarcerated with over 280 people doing life without parole. There were all kinds- Stabbed the neighbor lady 150+ times, shot a bully in the head in the school parking lot, beat a dude with a hammer, etc.

There were two that stuck with me though- one where he looked me right in the eye and told me about shooting a guy with a shotgun to the chest (creeped me the f out), weirdo that kidnapped and killed some girl in his basement was another. John Wayne Gacy actually designed the miniature golf course there.”

11. 99 to life.

“Was in prison for 27 months. Unfortunately, your child rapists and kiddie porn guys were mixed in to gen pop, so you would get all kinds like that everywhere. The worst one I heard of was when I was in military prison. Details are foggy because this was 13 years ago, but I remember there being a guy who got 99 years for murder.

He had killed a guy, then killed the guys wife because she was home and would have been a witness, but not before raping her first. The whole facility got locked down every time they moved this guy, because they didnt even want the other inmates to see what he looked like.

The other fucked up one was at the same facility. So in the army there’s a thing called turtlefucking, where you hit someone’s kevlar helmet with your kevlar helmet. It makes a loud THONK sound, but doesnt really hurt. People didnt hit super hard, just hard enough to make the noise happen. This guy turtlefucked a girl when she wasnt wearing a kevlar helmet. She ended up dying while the guy was still awaiting his trial, and he went full on cuckoo bananas.”

12. KKK member.

“I had a cellie in prison who was a KKK “white boy.” He was a mad man. He was always pissed off and would say the craziest stuff like “Did you hear that? The “white” rhino is going extinct. Fucking jews.”

I was watching the movie about black pilots in WWII and he sat down indignant and rolled his eyes and guffawed… “Black Pilots!?! C’mon.” I said “You really think there are no black pilots?” He said “Hell no, have you ever seen a black pilot?” It was like this every day until my move finally got approved.”

13. From an officer’s perspective.

“I wasn’t an inmate, I was an officer so my opinion might be disqualified. But at a facility I worked at we were a level 5 which is maximum security. Lots of people who had life without parole and just a bunch of different things happened. One guy was on a documentary because he traveled across several states and killed around 5 people total. He was pissed cause the documentary blamed him but he always tried to say his father hitting him as a child made him kill these people.

Then there’s the old guy who raped his young grandchildren and was furious that he was sent to prison cause they were HIS grandkids so he could do whatever he wanted. He had also raped his children when they were growing up.

Lots of sick things in a max security prison and those would be nothing when compared to a federal supermax.”

14. Sounds like a nightmare.

“Ahh.. theres different degrees to evil.. one of the smallest black guys in there was SO loud and would not stop talking. He eventually freaked out and cut his body up with a razor blade to get medical attention for a different scene.. another guy was young, got beat by a 70 yr. Old in dominoes. The young guy just straight punched the old man in the forehead, I was reading Marley and me, and it just sounded like someone hit a watermelon super hard. I looked up, old man was knocked out on the floor, when he came to, these other 18 yr old kids were cracking up laughing and the old man was sooo confused and kept asking why are you laughing?

A white guy who was small and young was the jack russell terrier of the pod, and he was the worst. He would just constantly steal and for some reason nobody did anything about it. Guy named nick looked just like mike Tyson and would fight white ppl who would work out bc they were doing it wrong..he would also stare at you while you were taking a shit.

There was one corrections officer who assaulted me in a bathroom during work duty bc I didnt know if a roll of toilet paper should be changed out.. there was like a 1/3 left. It was my first day, he thought I was fucking with him. After he hit me and was done, I said Sooooo, does it need to be changed i still dont know. He figured out I was serious and apologized. One CO always snuck me coffee and let me watch football on tv bc I was nice and worked hard.”

15. In the Bronx.

“Was in Spofford Juvenile detention center when I was 13 (not a good age to be there at 4’9 100 lbs) and I was one of two Caucasian’s in the entire place so I mostly kept to myself. I did befriend a kid named Chris Whitehead who showed up with a freshly healed scar about 15-20 inches long in the shape of a C on the side of his head. He didn’t talk much but he ended up telling me how it happened when I finally got the nerve to ask him.

Told me his older brother jumped him into the Crips and since he cried during he took a hot knife and burned it into his head for the disrespect. Then he had his little brother, the same age as me by the way, shoot the first person to cross the street in their neighborhood, who ended up being a young pregnant girl. How he only ended up at Spofford is beyond me but it was disgusting to see such a nice kid end up there because of his older piece of shit brother.

I remember when he went to court he was sure he’d be transferred so he pissed all over his jump suit and stuffed it in the radiator causing all of us in the semi violent block to be moved upstairs with the actual violent criminals (I think the kid I’m referring to was only on mine because of his age). The staff members there gave everyone there permission to beat the living shit out of him when he came back but he never did because he got transferred thankfully because his brother ended up there too and was fully on board with the beat down his brother was going to receive.

Really glad they shut down that place because they were running drugs and a prostitution ring on the female side and the treatment of the kids there was disgusting to say the least.”

Yikes. Prison is no place for this guy, I can tell you that much.

Have you ever spent any time behind bars or maybe a friend or family member did some time?

If so, tell us what it was like in the comments. We’d love to hear about your experiences!

The post Ex-Prisoners Talk About the Most Evil People They Encountered Behind Bars appeared first on UberFacts.

Mumbai is Testing Traffic Lights That Stay Red if They Detect Honking

Police in Mumbai, Indian are testing red lights that won’t turn green if drivers are laying on their horns. It’s a perfect solution for a busy city where noise pollution is one of its biggest problems, right?

Photo Credit: Needpix

Last year, Indian authorities conducted a trial with sensors attached to traffic light poles that detected street decibel levels. If noise levels registered more than 85 decibels, the traffic lights were set to delay turning green.

Mumbai’s lights, like other Indian cities, displays a timer on each light so drivers can see when it will change.

Photo Credit: Wikimedia

Police spokesman, Pranay Ashok, told CNN, the trial started with a run at several major intersections for 15 minutes a day. Police hope to roll the system out to the “entire traffic management system.”

A (hilarious) video posted to Twitter showed the effects of rampant noise pollution. In it, police describe the city as “the honking capital of the world.” Explaining what they call “The Punishing Signal,” they advise that if motorists want to keep moving, they should stop laying on the horn.

According to the TomTom Index, Mumbai has a serious problem with traffic congestion, ranking the fourth worst in the world last year.

The amount of congestion in the city translates to a loss of eight days and 17 hours per year for every driver and passenger.

It will be interesting to see if these monitored traffic lights make a difference. There are so many more pleasurable activities to do with that time than sit in traffic and listen to angry horns.

Don’t you agree?

The post Mumbai is Testing Traffic Lights That Stay Red if They Detect Honking appeared first on UberFacts.

By the End of 2020, China Plans to Ban Single-Use Plastic Bags in Every Major City

It’s a new decade – and China, for one, doesn’t plan to end it as a top contributor to the world’s pollution problem. At least, not when it comes to single-use plastic bags.

They plan to include plastic plates, cutlery, and straws in the ban as well.

 

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The Chinese National Development and Reform Commission detailed the plan, which includes the complete ban of non-degradable plastic bags in every major city in the country, with plans to expand to every city and town by 2022.

They’re providing exceptions to markets selling fresh products until 2025.

The government expects the hospitality industry to get on board by the same year, with restaurants stopping the use of plastic straws and cutlery, as well as reducing their other single-use plastic items by 30%. Hotels will operate under the same expectations.

Currently, China produces around 60 million tons of plastic waste every year, far and away the largest plastic polluter in the world. The U.S. is next on the list, throwing out 38 million tons of plastic per year – which, in case you’re not into math, means each person in the States creates almost 3x as much plastic pollution as each person in China.

China is also one of the world’s biggest manufacturers of plastics, and plans to expand its environmentally conscious approach to that area, as well: they’ve decided to no longer produce products that are less than 0.025mm thick. In a less environmental move, China no longer imports plastic recyclables from other countries, which has made it very difficult for recycling to maintain its cost efficiency in the United States.

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The FIRST baby leatherback turtle born in 2020 🥚🐢 after plastic ban in Thailand Thai citizens have been in full support of the single-use plastic ban campaign since the start of the year, and we deserve some celebrations 🥂for this small victory in protecting ocean lives — a rare baby leatherback turtle successfully hatched in Phang Nga province, under the close watch and protection from the officials at Khao Lam Pi – Hat Thai Mueang National Park. The impact of one single action is often more far-reaching than how we imagine it to be 🦋 Together we can make change happen! #gogreenfortheplanet เต่าทะเลมีจำนวนลดลงโดยเฉพาะขยะพลาสติกในทะเล แต่โพสต์นี้เป็นพิเศษ เมื่อไหร่จะมีข่าวดีนะคะ ลูกเต่ามะเฟืองตัวแรก ของปี 2563 คลานขึ้นจากหลุม ซึ่งมาจากแม่เต่าตัวแรกที่พบ วางไข่ในรอบ 6 ปี 🥚🐢 รณรงค์เรื่องขยะพลาสติกและมลภาวะในทะเลกันอย่างคึกคักช่วงนี้ #gogreenfortheplanet เพราะการแก้ปัญหาสิ่งแวดล้อม ลำพังจิตสำนึกอย่างเดียวไม่พอ ต้องอาศัยเครื่องมือหลายอย่าง และต้องลงมือทำกันทุกภาคส่วนค่ะ 📷: @seetanubungalows, Chiang Rai Times #leatherbackturtle #gogreen #saveourocean #bansingleuseplastic #sustainableliving #zerowastegoals #protectnature #zerowastethailand #plasticban #ecothailand

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Let’s be honest – the average person doesn’t need to use plastic bags at the grocery store or get a straw and plastic silverware every time they order takeout. There are simple workarounds that people choose not to use because they’re lazy and plastic is convenient.

If this proves anything, it’s that the government is going to have to step in – because regular people aren’t going to voluntarily make their own lives slightly harder, even for the good of the planet.

At least, not in high enough numbers to really make a difference.

The post By the End of 2020, China Plans to Ban Single-Use Plastic Bags in Every Major City appeared first on UberFacts.

A High School Senior was Promised a College Scholarship in Kindergarten and is Now Told She Can’t Have It

College affordability haunts parents and kids everywhere, pretty much from the time the little ones are born until they finally (hopefully) graduate with a degree. Costs have soared to the point where many cannot afford it, at least not without taking on obscene loads of student debt – so you can see why being promised scholarship money in kindergarten would have been an enormous relief for a family.

South Florida student Ynette Lopez was promised $3000 a year towards to Florida university of her choice back in 2007, but now that she’s finally getting ready to graduate from high school, the organization is telling only her, not the other 96 kids in her ‘class’, that she hasn’t qualified.

Ynette’s mother, Zondra Aimes says that she’s been in contact with the organization, I Have A Dream, but hasn’t gotten the answers she wanted.

“They stated that each kid would receive $3,000 per year for whatever four-year college or university for Florida only…Now that she’s a high school senior, she has been told that she hasn’t qualified for the tuition fees they promised.”

 

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She was given two reasons: one was that they moved (not out of Florida, just to a different county), and the other was that she “did not keep up with the program.” Zondra claims that she had confirmed with I Have A Dream that their move was ok, and that she checked in with them every year or two to make sure everything was still on track for the scholarship – and up until this year, I Have A Dream kept saying it was.

Legal expert Howard Finkelstein weighed in on the matter.

“Legally, this is really tricky, because the contract is not clear, and there is wiggle room for both sides. The foundation has a strong argument, because after Ynette moved, she did not go to any of their programs, and Zondra said she only contacted them every year or two. But favoring Ynette is that she got great grades, did volunteer work and became the kind of student the scholarship was created for.”

The head of the I Have a Dream Foundation Miami chapter, Stephanie Trump, confirmed that even though 21 kids moved out of the area after kindergarten, Ynette is the only one to be denied the scholarship.

 

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The senior is currently applying for scholarships elsewhere, but her mother is considering suing the foundation in small claims court. She would be willing to compromise, but believes her daughter deserves some amount of scholarship because she put in the work.

“She participated in at least six years of it, so $1500 every year instead of $3000? Something, because she did participate.”

It sounds reasonable to me, but I’m no lawyer – we’ll have to keep tabs and find out what happens, but whatever it is, I hope that Ynette has a great college experience and doesn’t let this stop her from the education she’s earned.

The post A High School Senior was Promised a College Scholarship in Kindergarten and is Now Told She Can’t Have It appeared first on UberFacts.

Check Out These Interesting Facts About True Crime and Criminals

True crime is incredibly popular – you can tell by the massive number of true crime TV shows, documentaries, movies, and podcasts that are available out there.

From the old stuff to the new, seemingly unbelievable stories, I find it all fascinating.

Here are 10 interesting crime facts for you to chew on…enjoy.

1. This is wild.

Photo Credit: did you know?

Source

2. Cowboy Bob.

Photo Credit: did you know?

Source 1 Source 2 Source 3

3. Public Enemy Number One.

Photo Credit: did you know?

Source 1 Source 2

4. The Zone of Death.

Photo Credit: did you know?

Source 1 Source 2 Source 3

5. Murder Mansion.

Photo Credit: did you know?

Source

6. Did you know this?

Photo Credit: did you know?

Source 1 Source 2

7. Real-life crime fighter.

Photo Credit: did you know?

Source 1 Source 2

8. French fries!

Photo Credit: did you know?

Source

9. A real wiseguy.

Photo Credit: did you know?

Source

10. Ice Cream Wars.

Photo Credit: did you know?

Source

Some fascinating crime history right there.

What are some of the crime stories that you find the most interesting?

Share them with us in the comments!

The post Check Out These Interesting Facts About True Crime and Criminals appeared first on UberFacts.

Here Are 6 Important Places to Visit for Black History Month

February is Black History Month, commemorating the remarkable contributions of Black Americans. It’s an incredible legacy essential for all Americans to know about.

You can often find parks and other sites right in your hometown dedicated to facets of African American history, though you may need to look around a bit. Take the time to delve into the achievements behind the designations – it’s worth it. You may be surprised at what you uncover about the influence of the Black artists, politicians and leaders where you live.

For a more in-depth look at the culture and history of Black citizens throughout the U.S., here are a few places you should make plans to visit this February.

1. Civil Rights Trail

Crossing 15 states, this national trail tells the long story of the struggle of Black people for equality (still ongoing today, we should mention). One of the most important locations of the trail is the site where police confronted marchers on the Edmund Pettus Bridge, in Selma, Alabama.

2. National Museum of African-American History and Culture

Located in Washington DC, the museum documents Black history and culture. It officially opened it’s doors in November, 2016.

Photo Credit: Wikipedia

3. Beale Street Historic District

Many influential musicians contributed their talents to the young jazz and blues scene in this Memphis neighborhood, including Louis Armstrong and B.B. King. Blues fan Elvis Presley would go on to use the music he heard here as a teenager to develop his own style, which many would say put a white face on an African American style of music, thus making it acceptable for it to gain mass popularity in the 50s.

Photo Credit: Picryl

4. Negro Leagues Baseball Museum

Sharing space with the American Jazz Museum located in Missouri, this space is dedicated to Black baseball players. It houses photos and exhibits highlighting the careers of greats such as Jackie Robinson, Buck O’Neill and many others.

Photo Credit: Wikimedia

5. African Meeting House

One of the oldest historically Black churches in the U.S., the African Meeting House was built in the early 1800s. Yo can find it in the Beacon Hill neighborhood in Boston, where it was significant as a meeting place for the Black community as they organized for the abolition of slavery.

Photo Credit: Wikimedia

6. Harriet Tubman Historical Park

Famously a leader of the Underground Railroad, Harriet Tubman dedicated herself to the cause of freedom from slavery, even when her dedication risked her own life. The land around her former home and her A.M.E. Zion church in Auburn, New York was made a national historic park in 2017.

Photo Credit: Flickr

There are hundreds of sites around the U.S. where you can learn about the rich, historical contributions of Black Americans. So this Black History Month, plan a visit to one to expand your knowledge about the heritage of Black culture—it’s a legacy not to be overlooked.

The post Here Are 6 Important Places to Visit for Black History Month appeared first on UberFacts.

Former Gang Members Recount How They Finally Got Out

For some people, joining a gang can be a matter of protection, or brotherhood, or lack of economic opportunity. I’d be willing to bet that more gangs than we think are filled mostly with people who are only there because there isn’t anywhere better for them. And once you’re in, it’s not always even an option to leave. These 13 AskReddit users were lucky: they got out. Here’s how.

1. “He wanted…to thank me for sparing his life”

I saved up enough money to put myself through school and to not have to work. All I wanted was enough money to get out. 5 years later I got my masters degree and now I work as an economist in the social services sector.

Haunt me…yeah. When I went to university I changed my Facebook name back to my real name. This guy who started a fight with me back in the day that I got word on and got the drop on got in touch with me asking if I ‘remembered him’. Seeing as how I maimed the guy instead of beating him (at the time I caught serious heat for this because it was construed as weakness) I thought he was getting ready to settle the score. I got in touch with my boys back home and they paid him a visit. Turns out he wanted to reach out to me to thank me for sparing his life and that he had turned his around. So my boys thought that was pretty funny and I had to paypal them all steak dinners and booze money.

2. Red Bandana

I got older and it all seemed stupid. Felt stupid representing a group of 7th grade dropouts. I wanted to represent myself. The ones that arent dead or in prison still live with their parents and all they have going for them in life is that red bandana.

3. So Dumb

Three things. A) Got too old for that stuff B) Joined the Army and C) realized – thankfully not too late – almost shooting someone dead for “talking crap to my boy” wasn’t in my best interest in the long term. I think back to that point and thank God I did not do something so dumb. Cringy.

4. “Most of my friends and enemies are either in jail, or working”

I was involved in one of the Vancouver gangs. I left around 2006 a few months after I got attacked on a rural road by 2 car loads of guys who had meant to shut down our delivery phone. They got one of our customers to call us on a Sunday morning, when they knew most of the people I’d call for backup would be sleeping.

If it wasn’t for some fancy driving on my part, I would have taken a beating from 8 guys with bats and batons. I’m glad I got out when I did, because even though people were killing each other prior to me leaving. They got really comfortable with it in the years after I left.

Past doesn’t really come back to haunt me, I moved away to grow weed in a different area and there wasn’t any “in it for life” mentality. In 2011 I moved back to the area. Most of my friends and enemies are either in jail, or working square jobs for the most part. I work in the hydroponic supplies industry, so I still work with a lot of gangsters from the marijuana industry, but they’re mostly chill dudes who want to work out all the time and play with expensive motorsports toys.

5. “I left it all that night”

I used to be a tag banger as a teenager. Think graffiti crew on the verge of being recognized as a street gang, due to it’s acts of violence and size. It was about 25 of us in a four block radius with a heavy presence in a half mile stretch of a main avenue. The night of August 22, 2003, I was in my room reading Luis Rodriguez’s ‘Always Running’. I heard gunshots a few blocks from my place. Thinking nothing of it I kept reading.

The next morning I found out it was an 18 year old named O, a close friend of mine. He was a member of a gang called 18th Street. He was caught leaving his pregnant girlfriend’s house by four enemy gang members, he was chased down and shot. I, along with three other ‘shotcallers’ from my crew, attended his funeral and burial. After the burial we were approached by an eighteener rep, he told us to show up to a party that night in O’s honor.

That night at the party we were taken to the back of the house were there was a meeting happening. My friend’s older brothers were big time in the gang, one of them calling shots from prison. And the latter wanted blood. The way they saw it O was killed in our neighborhood and as his friends we had to get back at his murderers. We were given an ultimatum, align with 18th street, drop our graffiti crew, and take care of any enemy members in our territory. In return they would provide guns, drugs, and the right to start our own chapter of the gang. If we refused we should either disband or consider ourselves in their crosshairs.

As silly as it all sounds, you’d be surprised how structured and diplomatic street gangs really are. So we gathered up all the guys and talked about it. We were pretty much split. I mentioned the book ‘Always Running’ because it showed me to consider the fact that the world is bigger than a couple city blocks. And O’s death made me question if dying for a few numbers and letters was worth it. I also had a girlfriend who I wanted to marry, not then at 18 but later down the line.

I left it all that night. More than half the guys took up 18 streets offer. Me and the rest were shunned. The following two months saw a surge of violence which capped off with two dumped bodies in the middle of a field. The police cracked down hard soon after.

I moved out of the neighborhood. Years later I married my girlfriend, we had a son, I worked hard while she finished her university studies. My dad still lives in that neighborhood, it is now an 18th Street bastion. I run into some of the guys when I visit dad. Most are in prison, dead, or strung out on drugs. The younger kids are the ones running the streets now. It’s a never ending cycle.

6. The Pattern

Personally, I ended up getting out cause I realized the pattern I was falling into. Before I even turned 18, I had 6 charges on my record, 2 of them felonies and I was on 3rd strike, which basically means if I commit another violent crime I can be locked away for life automatically and any non-violent crime, no matter how small it is, can be an automatic 7 years if they choose. As of right now, since my charges were all between the ages of 13-16, I’ve been told if I don’t get in trouble for the next 10 years after my last charge (2013), I can get my records expunged so that’s what I’m aiming for at the moment but it’s crazy knowing any little thing can send me back for such a long time because of how stupid I was as a teen. A lot of my friends never got the chance to get out, one of my friends is doing 12 years, he’s been in there since he was 17, and another one is doing life so I’m just glad I got out before that happened but I still have to be careful.

7. Teenage Felon

Fortunately (or unfortunately), I got arrested when I was 16 and charged with felony counts. It was reduced and I got my record expunged. After that, and figuring out that the people or “friends” I hung out with pretty much abandoned me right after the arrest, I got serious with my studies/school and stayed away from fights, getting trouble, etc. I think it has also made me more mindful and mature growing up, since I wasn’t too into parties anymore and hanging out — although it’s definitely made me more conflicted with interpersonal relationships and trust even today. I still don’t completely trust the legal system and cops; especially remembering when I was handcuffed and chained with others (my group) and walked out of the precinct and into the police car to be ushered to jail.

At any rate, the only real time it has come to haunt me was being forced to put it into my law school applications. Even if a record is expunged, apparently I still needed to write it in and write an explanation. Hasn’t affected my admissions cycle, but I was pretty shocked but of course not surprised since records don’t just disappear even after being expunged.

8. Brazilian Hooligans

Brazilian here. I was a teenager in the mid-2000’s. Used to hang with a lot of other kids who were also low-middle class and had a lot of time and liberty to be on the streets causing havoc. A lot of them were hooligans (in Brazil hooligans are really common in major cities with big football teams, but it’s somewhat different from those in Europe. People hang in the “torcidas organizadas”, wear uniforms, sometimes carry guns and fight over petty things with people from other “torcidas”. The main goal is to beat and steal the other crews material’s, like shirts, hats, flags and this kind of stuff. Its not uncommon to see people die over this ridiculous nonsense). Anyway, it was a large gang, but no one did heavy stuff, like killing people (even though sometimes someone was packing a revolver or a pistol), at least I never heard of something like that. We used to beat the crap out of other people from other hoods, though. Some of us were REALLY violent. A lot of my friends trained martial arts just for the sake of kicking people’s butts on the street.

I stopped hanging around because some of my friends got arrested for attempted murder, and they just didn’t care even after jail. Some of them also sold weed and I began to wake up to the fact that things were getting more serious. I had a lot of doubts before, after seeing people get wrecked over nothing. Like, random street fights were common. I chose to focus on school, and years later I’m a lawyer with no criminal background, thankfully. My friends from that time are doing okay, I guess. They are alive, and I think that’s a good thing, considering what they used to do and how many enemies they made.

9. “I was making the world a worse place”

When I was 14 I became involved in a criminal organisation. It wasn’t street crime, it was organised crime (they looked down on street crime but for things they were also guilty of).

When I was 16 one of my best friends was killed. That was the first thing that made me think that this wasn’t something I could do forever. After that, the whole thing kind of just broke down. The walls closed in and a few people had to leave the country and some of us that stayed tied up the loose ends and rolled up our thing into the major thing and called it a day.

Psychologically it was that I was making the world a worse place. That was the thing that for me made me want to stop. I didn’t want to contribute to the suffering in the world and in people’s lives and I was. I made my family miserable, my old friends were scared of me, my new “friends” didn’t like me because I was always lashing out, and there were people I’d wronged for no reason.

My past has never come back to haunt me. There are times when somebody will say something but even when I run into people I had disagreements with but we just go our separate ways.

10. “When you are in a gang you are paranoid”

I was in one of the largest and most feared Mexican gangs in Los Angeles. But the crazy thing was that no one outside of my close friends and cousins knew. To the outside world I was a baby faced kid with a comb over that was enrolled in Honors classes his entire life. What made me leave was the fact that I lived by own code (I did not jump people, I didn’t tag and I didn’t steal) and a lot of other members did not like that. My cousins and uncles were shot callers so I was somewhat safe. But I quickly found myself looking over my shoulder. When, you are in a gang you are paranoid. I was originally recruited for my brain and muscle. These however ultimately pulled me away from the gang life. I ended up getting accepted to colleges and took up boxing and MMA. The final push was when I became a Christian my Senior year of high school.

I am currently double majoring in theological studies and computer science. As for my past coming back to haunt me, I did see a ghost the other day. I was on my way to work at 4am and I heard a skateboard rolling behind me. And I noticed its speed was irregular (you learn this after years of paranoia) I clenched my fist ready for some fool to try to mug me. But then I heard someone say my name It was my best friend from high school. His family was from MS-13 a notorious Salvadorian gang. I say I saw a ghost because he was a shell of what he used to be. He ended up getting high on his own supply, being kicked out of his house and beaten out of the gang for stealing (his dad was a shot caller he would have been killed if not for that). That’s my story and the story of so many poor first generation Latino Americans from the hood.

11. Fleeing the Country

I used to be a “big brother” in a certain chivalrous organization. There were a combination of factors for my departure, chief among them was that I had a serious problem with the newer generations and how they perceived power, and quite frankly, I grew tired. Of those that joined our ranks who were from the newer generations, they did not understand basic concepts of honor, respect, or dignity, which added pressure to an increasingly volatile territorial issue that we were facing – they didn’t seem to understand that violence was only meant to be a tool, not just the way we handled every interaction with everybody that we encountered. We filled a niche that law enforcement weren’t traditionally able to accommodate but there was obviously a darker side to our work, and some people were neither mentally nor psychologically capable of handling the dual nature of our existence in society.

There was, what I’d consider, a huge war that erupted a few decades ago when one of the bosses of a large chivalrous organization had passed away naturally of a heart-attack. This left a power vacuum that wasn’t meant to stay empty because of the ambitions of several men who felt that it was their right to step up and fill that absence.

Long story short, there were many of us who were killed and seriously injured. I was shot several times during all of this but managed to survive. At this point, I decided that I had had enough. I had been learning English, Russian, and German, working on becoming fluent in those languages, which was very difficult. During the chaos of the fallout of what had happened, I grabbed my rainy day fund and fled the country to live abroad.

Since then, I have lived simply, without the ostentatious displays of wealth and power that I had been accustomed to. I hated every minute of it initially and wept bitterly over the loss of my possessions, my lifestyle, my brothers, my home.

I now work as a baker, living a much simpler (but more satisfying) life, and I am raising a daughter. I stay away from nightlife, which is incompatible with my work hours and trying to be a responsible parent. I don’t drink or smoke anymore. I am friendly with the people I work with and with customers, but I never talk about myself, preferring instead to ask them questions about themselves – people will tell you anything if you show interest when they talk about themselves (which was one of the key tools I learned back in my past life.) So far, no repercussions from my past as far as I can tell, which is more than what I deserve if I’m being honest.

I imagine someday everything will catch up with me. But I want to shield my daughter from all of that as much as I can. I want her memories of me to be favorable. I want her to believe that I am a boring person who has banal routines and simple pleasures.

12. “It didn’t feel like I was in a gang at the time”

During high school, I was best friends with this guy Mike. Mike was a really mouthy kid though, and would run his mouth to a group of kids that lived in the co-op across the street from our bus stop. Running his mouth turned into a couple small “fights” — mostly the kind of high school fights were everyone stands around mouthing off but not actually throwing punches. Some days, the co-op kids would be waiting for Mike to get off the bus, so every afternoon when the bus dropped us off, we would check to see if these kids were there waiting. If they were, then a group of us would all get off the bus because we wanted to have his back and make sure that he didn’t get jumped.

This went on for a pretty long time before some of the co-op kids started bringing baseball bats and threatening us with them. I think they were just trying to look tough, and I’m not sure that they would have actually done anything, since most of the “fighting” up to that point was really just standing around and swearing at each other. But when Mike’s older cousin (who was in his 20’s) heard about the baseball bats, he went ballistic and showed up the next day with a bat of his own.

That was the tipping point right there. Now these co-op kids started getting their older brothers and cousins involved too. About a week later, Mike got jumped.

Mike’s cousin got a couple of his older friends involved and, before we knew it, people were being attacked. We didn’t go anywhere alone anymore, and usually brought a group of friends and some of the older guys with us. Anytime someone from our group was attacked, our older guys would retaliate, which would cause the other side to retaliate. It was just a circle.

It didn’t feel like I was in a gang at the time. It just felt like we had a group of older guys protecting us but, looking back, I would definitely now say that it was a gang. The problem was that you couldn’t just get out if you wanted to. If I had cut off ties with my group and the older guys, I would have had nobody to protect me and I would have got the life kicked out of me by the co-op kids.

Thankfully, I got into college and left town. During my first year of college, my family moved, so I didn’t have to go back and deal with the gang anymore. In the couple years after I left, I heard that things had really escalated: one of the co-op kids was killed, and one of the older guys on our side also died. Mike and his cousin started dealing weed by the pound, and his cousin was eventually busted and took the fall for that and went to jail.

I don’t think anyone in my group considered it to be a gang even though it was, so they were all understanding when I left for college and when my family moved. I don’t keep in touch with any of them except for Mike, and even then it’s just an occasional Facebook message to see how he’s doing.

That was all about 7-8 years ago and my past hasn’t come back to haunt me, although I’m still very weary that I’ll run into a couple of the co-op kids someday and they’ll still have a grudge against me.

13. “Eventually you just get too old”

I used to have a very serious drug problem, coupled with the fact I grew up in a rough hood, it was inevitable. Basically I needed protection and drugs. Eventually you just get too old for that. Kicked my drug habit several years ago, found an amazing girl and realized I didn’t have to stay in such a dangerous spot. We moved out to the mountains and aside from my police record and my ongoing struggle with addiction, I left those demons back in the city. For real though, you can leave your hood so easily if you want to. Took me so long to realize that.

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Here is What The Symbols on the Dollar Bill Really Mean

Have you ever studied a dollar bill and thought about what all those symbols meant? I’ve always heard random theories: aliens, Freemasons, other secret societies, etc.

Let’s put an end to all the conspiracy and speculation, and get down to the nitty gritty.

1. Pyramid

Photo Credit: iStock

The pyramid on the dollar bill represents strength and duration. The western face of the pyramid has a shadow while other parts of it are in full light, which some think referenced that the western part of the country hadn’t been explored yet when the design was completed – or perhaps that it was still undetermined what the U.S. could achieve for Western civilization.

2. The eye above the pyramid.

Photo Credit: iStock

Three different committees made suggestions about the design of this seal, and the first included Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, and John Adams (strong group). The trio wanted an “all-seeing eye,” and they got it. The eye enclosed in the shape of a pyramid is an ancient symbol of divinity.

3. The letters at the base of the pyramid.

Photo Credit: iStock

You see the letters “MDCCLXXVI” across the base of the pyramid, which are the Roman numerals for the year 1776, the year our country declared its independence.

4. The eagle’s shield.

Photo Credit: iStock

As you can see, the eagle’s shield is not supported by anything. This symbolizes that Americans should rely on their own virtue and not on anyone or anything else. The horizontal bar at the top of the shield represents the federal government and the 13 stripes below it are for the 13 individual states that existed when it was designed.

5. The stars above the eagle.

Photo Credit: iStock

This one is pretty easy. The 13 stars represent the original 13 colonies in the country.

6. The eagle’s talons.

Photo Credit: iStock

The eagle holds an olive branch in one claw, representing peace, and arrows in the other, representing war. I honestly had no idea about this one…very interesting.

7. The lucky number 13.

Photo Credit: iStock

The number 13 pops up in many places on the dollar bill. There are 13 olive branch leaves, 13 arrows, 13 olive fruits, 13 steps on the pyramid, 13 stars above the eagle, and 13 bars on the eagle’s shield.

Oh, and “annuit coeptis” and “e pluribus unum” both have 13 letters.

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Meet the Indigenous Athletes Who Are Running for Their People

A lot of young kids who play high school sports never think twice about who’s watching them, what it could mean to the larger world if they win or lose, and what traditions or expectations might be riding on their shoulders.

Even fewer know what it feels like to compete as a symbol of an entire people. When now-college student Rosalie Fish ran for Muckleshoot Tribal School near Seattle, she realized she was not just the face of the Cowlitz Tribe of southwest Washington, but of indigenous people everywhere.

 

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In middle school, Rosalie liked running with her friends, improving her times, and staying in shape. But at the new tribal high school, things were different.

“They told me, ‘Oh, well, you know, track is a little spotty in attendance. And I said, ‘Ok. That doesn’t affect me.’”

When she went to her first practice, she realized she would be the only runner – all of the other kids were doing field events.

When Muckleshoot attended events, Rosalie said sometimes she wasn’t even invited to run, despite having times that should have easily qualified her.

Once, when she called to ask why, she was shocked at the racist response she received.

“They asked me if I even had a uniform. I guess I was just really naive to the type of racism and prejudice that comes in through sports because I’m white-passing. So I never really experienced that firsthand like I did with having ‘Muckleshoot Tribal School’ on my uniform.”

She experienced similar discrimination and hate while playing basketball and cheering for the boys’ teams in several sports. Once, she found graffiti on a bathroom wall that said ‘Indian Savages’ and ‘Indian Drunks live off the government.’ She couldn’t help but think of what the younger students at the school – including her own siblings – would feel if they saw.

“I think I felt more let down than anything. Almost, like, disappointment – like, ‘This is still something that I have to fight. I can’t believe that this is the way that people still perceive us’ – and maybe sad in the fact that this is something that my younger siblings are going to have to challenge, that these are some things that all of the middle school and elementary schoolers at tribal school are going to have to face.”

She looked at running as a way to prove to everyone else that they were wrong about native people everywhere, so she started doing harder workouts and practicing six days a week. She changed her diet and even ditched friends who weren’t supported of her newfound passion.

At first, she let the internalized discrimination get to her, but as she began to hit, then exceed her expectations, her confidence grew.

“If I go to my next meet and I just biff it, they’re not going to look at me as some kid who wasn’t ready. They’re going to look at, you know, the Native girl who didn’t belong there. And that was really what kept me going is knowing that I’m not just representing myself at these meets. I’m representing my tribe, and I’m representing Indigenous people.”

That was when Rosalie realized that she wanted to run for more than herself – she wanted to use her success, and the fact that people were looking at her, to shine a spotlight on something else.

In the United States, murder is the third-leading cause of death among Native women, and in Canada, Native women are four times as likely to be murdered as their non-Native counterparts.

In recent years, activists had begun to shine a spotlight on this present and growing issue – one that is near and dear to Rosalie’s heart because her aunt, Alice Looney, was murdered in 2004.

“I grew up seeing lots of missing poster signs of Native girls and Native women – or just stories of Native women being murdered. And then it wasn’t until people started talking about it kind of online and in Indian Country Today and these kinds of platforms where I would see ‘missing and murdered Indigenous women epidemic.’”

That’s when Rosalie learned about Native runner Jordan Marie Daniel, who competed in the Boston Marathon with a red handprint over her mouth and MMIW (Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women) painted down her leg.

She dedicated each mile of her race to a different missing woman, the paint meant to symbolize how many of her people had been silenced by violence.

For Rosalie, it was a moment when she stopped feeling hopeless and began to feel as if she could do something to help.

With the state track meet coming up, Rosalie knew she had a chance to have a platform. She messaged Jordan Marie Daniel on Instagram, asking permission to borrow her idea.

“And I said, ‘Of course,’” Jordan told WBUR. “I felt very inspired that she was inspired by me.”

Rosalie was star-struck and freaking out, but it didn’t take long for the two to become close – they called each other ‘sister’ in their languages, and Jordan told Rosalie to reach out any time she needed to talk. And Rosalie did reach out, after running her state races with a red handprint over her mouth, each one dedicated to a missing or murdered Indigenous woman, one of whom was her aunt.

“It was my first time not running for myself. And everybody kept asking me, you know, ‘How does it feel to be a state champion? How does it feel to be up there on the podium with this gold medal?’ And I kind of just wanted to tell them to leave me alone.”

She struggled, though, feeling that winning a high school state championship was frivolous compared to the lives of these women who were disappearing and dying at an alarming rate.

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This was a very emotional and very powerful weekend for me. I was inspired and supported by marathon runner and activist Jordan Marie Daniels to run for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women. I dedicated my 1600 to Alice Looney, my 800 to Jacqueline Salyers, my 3200 to Renee Davis, and my 400 to Misty Upham. Wellpinit runner Gabriel Kieffer also donated a medal to Misty. I am honored by the families that allowed me to represent these women and I am blessed to be able to run for them. MTS King’s girl’s team placed for the first time (4th) at state championships with only three competitors. While my other two teammates are much younger than me, I learned a lot from them. I’m so excited to see what they do for MTS and Indian Country in the future.

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“The whole event – state championships – felt so insignificant to the issue I was representing. I didn’t feel like celebrating. I didn’t – I couldn’t celebrate, and I had run a slower time than I anticipated because everything felt so heavy. And so I went and I messaged Jordan that night and I asked her, ‘What’s going on?’ Like, ‘Is this normal?’”

Luckily for Rosalie, Jordan knew exactly what she meant – she told WBUR that the emotional and mental toll of running races for women who had lost their lives had caused her to stop racing.

“It’s not just the fact that it’s an epidemic; it’s the details of some of the research that I do and finding the names thatI want to run for and who I want to run for and dedicate it to. And it’s those details of what happened to them that are in my head and, you know, it’s creating a very dark environment for me.”

She had to face the fact that her activism was causing her depression and anxiety, and she decided to take care of her own mental health for awhile.

After talking to Jordan, who advised her to remember she was honoring those missing and Indigenous women to the best of her ability, Rosalie felt renewed in her mission. Instead of pushing herself just to win, she went out wanting to conduct herself in a way that represented the missing women with integrity and strength.

“I absolutely still felt heavy when I ran, but I felt more prepared.”

Rosalie is now running track at Iowa Central Community College, she’s still close to Jordan Marie Daniel, and she still dedicates her races to those women who remain so close to her heart.

She plans to continue “until I feel like I don’t have to anymore.”

I think we can all agree that we hope that happens sooner than later, but until then, keep running Rosalie. We’re all cheering you on.

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