Check out This Museum in Santa Cruz, California, Dedicated to Surfing

Three Hawaiian princes brought the sport of surfing to the U.S. and a Santa Cruz museum tells that story.

The Santa Cruz Surfing Museum is inside a lighthouse on Monterrey Peninsula’s northern tip. Although surfing is an old Polynesian sport, Santa Cruz is known as its entry point into the U.S.

Photo Credit: Wikipedia

It was in the middle of summer in 1885 when the princes David Kawananakoa, Edward Keliiahonui and Jonah Kuhio Kalaniana’ole of Hawaii, who were attending St. Matthew’s military school in San Mateo, California, decided to get some boards made and drop them in the ocean.

Everyone enjoying their day at the beach became mesmerized by the trio riding the waves on their massive redwood surfboards.

Photo Credit: Wikipedia

Eventually, the boys left Santa Cruz to return to Hawaii and join the fight for independence. But even after they left, local kids would continue to imitate the way the Hawaiians surfed. Since then, Santa Cruz has always been regarded as the place where California surf culture was born.

Today, in the Santa Cruz Surfing Museum, visitors can see 130 years of surfing chronicled in photographs, surfboards and other mementos.

Photo Credit: Flickr

The lighthouse was a gift in memory of 18-year-old Mark Abbott who drowned in a body surfing accident in 1965. His parents used his life insurance policy to erect the lighthouse in his honor because he loved the ones that dotted the Oregon coast.

The museum was opened inside the lighthouse in 1986 by the city. Surfing is a beloved pastime for many living there and was one of Mark’s favorite activities. From the lighthouse, which sits directly on the ocean, surfing fans can watch perfect 10s and remember the Hawaiian royalty that brought the sport of surfing to the U.S.

What do you think? Want to visit? Let us know if you have in the comments and what you thought!

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10 Interesting Facts About Music History

I’ve been into music since I was a little kid and I feel like I grew up on the good stuff. From my parents, it was mostly oldies: the Beach Boys, the Beatles, the Everly Brothers, Sam Cooke.

And then my older brother got me into punk and metal: the Ramones, Black Sabbath, AC/DC, and all other kinds of bands that warped my young brain. Thanks to all of them for that music education!

Music is the soundtrack to our lives, so turn it up!

Let’s dive into some interesting facts about music and music history!

1. That makes sense.

Photo Credit: did you know?

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2. Time well spent by the FBI…

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3. They were trailblazers.

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4. This is awesome.

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5. The cut up technique.

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6. Only one take.

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7. One of the last photos of a legend.

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8. The cops are here!

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9. A happy accident.

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10. A song with meaning.

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Those are some interesting facts about music history right there!

Who are some of your favorite bands of all time? How about current favorite bands?

Tell us in the comments!

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10 Interesting Facts About Music History

I’ve been into music since I was a little kid and I feel like I grew up on the good stuff. From my parents, it was mostly oldies: the Beach Boys, the Beatles, the Everly Brothers, Sam Cooke.

And then my older brother got me into punk and metal: the Ramones, Black Sabbath, AC/DC, and all other kinds of bands that warped my young brain. Thanks to all of them for that music education!

Music is the soundtrack to our lives, so turn it up!

Let’s dive into some interesting facts about music and music history!

1. That makes sense.

Photo Credit: did you know?

Source

2. Time well spent by the FBI…

Photo Credit: did you know?

Source 1 Source 2

3. They were trailblazers.

Photo Credit: did you know?

Source 1 Source 2

4. This is awesome.

Photo Credit: did you know?

Source 1 Source 2 Source 3

5. The cut up technique.

Photo Credit: did you know?

Source 1 Source 2

6. Only one take.

Photo Credit: did you know?

Source 1 Source 2

7. One of the last photos of a legend.

Photo Credit: did you know?

Source 1 Source 2

8. The cops are here!

Photo Credit: did you know?

Source

9. A happy accident.

Photo Credit: did you know?

Source 1 Source 2

10. A song with meaning.

Photo Credit: did you know?

Source

Those are some interesting facts about music history right there!

Who are some of your favorite bands of all time? How about current favorite bands?

Tell us in the comments!

The post 10 Interesting Facts About Music History appeared first on UberFacts.

Science Has Brought a 3,000-Year-Old Mummy’s Voice Back to Life

In the vast pile of cool things offered to us by science, a talking 3,000-year-old mummy has got to come out somewhere near the top.

Laypeople, historians, archaeologists, and scientists alike have all been fascinated with the legacy of Ancient Egypt since we first discovered the remains of their society. Since they were remarkably advanced in many areas, we’ve gotten to know them better than most bygone civilizations – and now, because of the careful way they had of preserving their dead, we can also hear one of their voices.

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#nesyamun

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A team of UK scientists was able to reconstruct the vocal tract of one mummy using CT scans, 3D printing, and an electronic larynx. The project has been going on since 2013, and to make it come to life, experts from the areas of clinical science, archaeology, Egyptology, museum curation, and electrical engineering had to come together for the good of all.

Ok. Here it is:

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(You’ll want your sound on.) A replica of a 3,000-year-old mummy’s vocal tract has revealed how that mummy might sound if he rose from the dead. Using CT scans of the mummified Egyptian priest Nesyamun (his inner coffin lid is shown), researchers mapped the exact shape of the mummy’s vocal tract — which governs the unique sound of a person’s voice. When connected to an artificial voice box, a 3-D printed mold of the mummy’s vocal tract produces a sound somewhere between the vowels in “bed” and “bad,” researchers report. But Nesyamun’s undead utterance doesn’t quite mimic his original voice, because the mummy’s tongue, which affects the shape of the vocal tract, is dried up and flattened out. Rather, “we’ve created the sound that he would make if he was to speak as he currently lies in his sarcophagus,” electronic engineer David Howard says. The plastic mold of the priest’s vocal tract cannot say full words, but using a computer simulation of the vocal tract with a jaw and tongue that move, “we could make him speak,” Howard says. Using inscriptions in the mummy’s tomb and other ancient religious texts, the researchers may someday render vocal recordings of Nesyamun’s own prayers and the daily liturgy that he would have performed in his duties as a priest. . . . (📸: © @leedsmuseumsandgalleries 🔊: D.M. Howard et al/Scientific Reports 2020) . . . #science #mummy #egypt #history #archaeology #ancientegypt #nesyamun #sarcophagus

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The six years of dedication resulted in returning the 3,000-years-gone Nesyamun’s voice to his throat. And yes, right now it’s just a single sound – but rest assured, they are working on more.

The amazing accomplishment was only possible because Nesyamun’s larynx and throat were remarkably well-preserved. This stroke of luck allowed scientists to totally reconstruct his vocal tract, which they then printed using a 3D printer, explained lead author and professor David Howard of the University of London to IFLScience.

“This process allows the sound of his tract as he is in his sarcophagus, which is a sound that his vocal tract can make – so it is his voice.”

That makes it sound a bit creepy, like something that happens at the outset of a horror movie, but it’s also cool.

“When it comes to any thoughts of producing running speech, things are different but there are possibilities. Combining knowledge of phonetics and linguistics with speech science means that we could use it to anticipate typical articulatory gestures that he would have used to change his vocal tract shape and therefore do this in software and create running speech. So that is an idea – there is a load of work to do to get anywhere near this but it is a distinct possibility for the future.”

In a twist of fate (or is it something more?) Nesyamun means “True of Voice” – he was a priest, incense-bearer, and scribe at an ancient temple at Karnak. He died around 1100 B.C.E. and due to his state of preservation, he’s one of the most-studied mummies in Britain’s “Voice of the Past” project.

As a history nerd, but an ancient history nerd first, this is just thrilling, one syllable or more.

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Check Out These Interesting Facts About True Crime and Criminals

True crime is incredibly popular – you can tell by the massive number of true crime TV shows, documentaries, movies, and podcasts that are available out there.

From the old stuff to the new, seemingly unbelievable stories, I find it all fascinating.

Here are 10 interesting crime facts for you to chew on…enjoy.

1. This is wild.

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2. Cowboy Bob.

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3. Public Enemy Number One.

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4. The Zone of Death.

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5. Murder Mansion.

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6. Did you know this?

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7. Real-life crime fighter.

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8. French fries!

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9. A real wiseguy.

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10. Ice Cream Wars.

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Some fascinating crime history right there.

What are some of the crime stories that you find the most interesting?

Share them with us in the comments!

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Learn About the Molasses Flood That Devastated Boston in 1919

Boston has been home to many historic events, but some overshadow others. And this one perhaps tops the category of weirdest disaster…

On July 15, 1919, Boston was hit with an oft-overlooked event of mass destruction: Molasses flooded the city’s streets and left a path of wreckage in its way.

Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

How, you ask? That’s a great question.

At the time, Boston was home to a company called Purity Distilling Company. The company built a monumental tank in 1915 to process molasses that could later be used to distill alcohol.

Molasses is used for both commercial and potable alcohol (it’s safe as long as it’s done properly), and this was a major source of revenue for Purity Distilling.

The tank had a capacity of 2.5 million gallons, and it was nearly full on the morning of the incident. Witnesses later mentioned that they heard noises comparable to gunshots as the tank’s steel sides and rivets collapsed. Then, suddenly, a 15-foot wave consisting of 26 million pounds of molasses spewed from the side of the tank, slowly causing calamity all over the city.

21 people perished, and approximately 150 people were injured. Emergency responders and police did what they could to help those who were trapped, but molasses is extremely sticky, complicating their efforts.

Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

After helping those affected, the city also had to deal with cleaning up after millions of gallons of molasses.

Photo Credit: Public Domain

Later it was revealed that the accident occurred because the company never involved a qualified engineer with the construction of their molasses-holding tank. The state of Massachusetts took action, passing stricter legislation overseeing construction to prevent similar accidents in the future.

Truly, trapped in a wave of molasses is a horrifying way to die…

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Here Are 6 Important Places to Visit for Black History Month

February is Black History Month, commemorating the remarkable contributions of Black Americans. It’s an incredible legacy essential for all Americans to know about.

You can often find parks and other sites right in your hometown dedicated to facets of African American history, though you may need to look around a bit. Take the time to delve into the achievements behind the designations – it’s worth it. You may be surprised at what you uncover about the influence of the Black artists, politicians and leaders where you live.

For a more in-depth look at the culture and history of Black citizens throughout the U.S., here are a few places you should make plans to visit this February.

1. Civil Rights Trail

Crossing 15 states, this national trail tells the long story of the struggle of Black people for equality (still ongoing today, we should mention). One of the most important locations of the trail is the site where police confronted marchers on the Edmund Pettus Bridge, in Selma, Alabama.

2. National Museum of African-American History and Culture

Located in Washington DC, the museum documents Black history and culture. It officially opened it’s doors in November, 2016.

Photo Credit: Wikipedia

3. Beale Street Historic District

Many influential musicians contributed their talents to the young jazz and blues scene in this Memphis neighborhood, including Louis Armstrong and B.B. King. Blues fan Elvis Presley would go on to use the music he heard here as a teenager to develop his own style, which many would say put a white face on an African American style of music, thus making it acceptable for it to gain mass popularity in the 50s.

Photo Credit: Picryl

4. Negro Leagues Baseball Museum

Sharing space with the American Jazz Museum located in Missouri, this space is dedicated to Black baseball players. It houses photos and exhibits highlighting the careers of greats such as Jackie Robinson, Buck O’Neill and many others.

Photo Credit: Wikimedia

5. African Meeting House

One of the oldest historically Black churches in the U.S., the African Meeting House was built in the early 1800s. Yo can find it in the Beacon Hill neighborhood in Boston, where it was significant as a meeting place for the Black community as they organized for the abolition of slavery.

Photo Credit: Wikimedia

6. Harriet Tubman Historical Park

Famously a leader of the Underground Railroad, Harriet Tubman dedicated herself to the cause of freedom from slavery, even when her dedication risked her own life. The land around her former home and her A.M.E. Zion church in Auburn, New York was made a national historic park in 2017.

Photo Credit: Flickr

There are hundreds of sites around the U.S. where you can learn about the rich, historical contributions of Black Americans. So this Black History Month, plan a visit to one to expand your knowledge about the heritage of Black culture—it’s a legacy not to be overlooked.

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19 Toys You’ll Remember if You Grew up in the Glorious ’80s

The ’80s were great for many reasons: music, cool movies, ridiculous hairstyles and parachute pants, the list goes on and on.

You know what else was really cool from that decade?

THE TOYS!

We had all kinds of awesome gadgets and toys to play with. Let’s get all nostalgic and take a look at some of the best toys the ’80s had to offer.

1. Remember Popples?

Photo Credit: Throwbacks

2. My Buddy and Kid Sister.

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3. Fisher Price Medical Kit.

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4. Fisher Price Music Box Teaching Clock

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5. Monchhichis were a big hit in Japan before coming to the U.S.

Photo Credit: Throwbacks

6. Tree Tots Tree House.

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7. Sit ‘n Spin.

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8. Fisher Price Stove.

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9. I definitely had the See ‘N Say Farmer.

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10. Wuzzles even briefly had their own TV show!

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11. The classic Big Wheels.

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12. Fisher Price Gas Pump.

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13. Snoopy Sno-Cone Machine.

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14. Micky Mouse Talking Telephone.

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15. Fisher Price Cash Register.

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16. Sesame Street Poppin’ Pals.

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17. Care Bears were HUGE.

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18. Little People Play House.

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19. Fisher Price Record Player.

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Wow, that sure was a trip down memory lane!

Did you own any of these awesome toys from the 1980s?

Tell us all about it in the comments!

The post 19 Toys You’ll Remember if You Grew up in the Glorious ’80s appeared first on UberFacts.

What Is a Pooh, and Why Is Winnie One?

Winnie the Pooh is, in fact, a bear. He lives in the woods, he eats honey, he loves to sleep, he looks like a bear…all of the signs are there.

So why, then, is he referred to as “the pooh?” And what exactly IS a pooh, anyway?

I have to confess that I never really thought too much about it until someone asked me that question, and then, well, I just had to know the answer.

 

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To find it we have to travel way back in time to the 1920s when A.A. Milne first published his stories about the Hundred-Acre Wood

When the stories were very first written, Winnie wasn’t Winnie at all – in the original drafts he was Edward Bear. Then, on a visit to the London Zoo, Milne encountered a very friendly black bear who had been named after Winnipeg, Canada.

And thus, Winnie came into being.

But what is Pooh?

Well, Pooh referred originally to a swan.

In the book When We Were Very Young, Milne included a poem explaining how Christopher Robin would feed the swan in the mornings – a swan called “Pooh,” which is “a very fine name for a swan, because if you call him and he doesn’t come (which is a thing swans are good at), then you can pretend that you were just saying ‘Pooh!’ to show him how little you wanted him.”

Then the swan character was shown the door and Edward was renamed; Winnie the Pooh was born.

If that doesn’t satisfy you, A.A. Milne wrote in the first chapter of the first Winnie the Pooh book, “But his arms were so stiff …they stayed up straight into the air for more than a week, and whenever a fly came and settled on his nose he had to blow it off. And I think – but I am not sure – that that is why he is always called Pooh.”

So there’s that too.

The reasoning, of course, doesn’t matter all that much because the name stuck. Winnie the Pooh – or just Pooh – became an icon for children all over the world, and the rest, as they say, is history.

He even has his own holiday (Winnie the Pooh Day is January 18th, if you care to celebrate).

However he came by his name, and however you came to find him, there’s almost no chance you don’t love him – and I would never “pooh”a Winnie the Pooh date with my kids.

Or myself, to be honest.

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Learn About the Most (In)Famous Failed Scientific Experiment in History

Scientists usually assume that if they ever get famous it will be for doing something right – but in the case of the Michelson-Morley experiment, those involved are forever going to be remembered for conducting the worst (best?) failed experiment in history.

Then again, if you end up changing literally everything in your field, was your experiment really a failure at all?

Here’s what happened.

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#WePost @4biddenknowledge ⚛👁 ・・・ The #DoubleSlitExperiment is an experiment in #QuantumPhysics in which the effects were shown by #ThomasYoung way back in 1803, but since has been proven even more strange by many others. It's power truly reveals a mind-altering view of the world and how we affect it. To explain this experiment, we first must truly grasp the difference between a  #particle and a #wave. A particle is what we perceive as #matter of some sort – something with mass. A wave is a disturbance in some type of substance – like ripples through water. Ok, that's easy enough. Now, what if I told you that a subatomic particle isn't a particle until a consciousness observes it. What is it then? Its a wave. Huh? For some unknown reason that haunts scientists, everything we perceive as having mass is just a wave of information (or possibilities) until we observe it in some way. I'm not talking in the philosophical way like if a tree falls in the woods and no one's there to hear it, does it make a sound. The Double Slit Experiment seems to answer that question as you'll see. Until we observe the soon to be particle, its a wave that's actually doing every possibility it could do at the same time. Huh?!?! It doesn't make any sense, yet this is one experiment that appears to somewhat prove this. The Double Slit Experiment shows us that we create reality just by observing it. WHOA, create reality?! Yes we do. Your consciousness collapses wave functions into digitized bits of matter that we then perceive as reality. You are not creating reality, but you are creating your own #RealityTunnel and most people aren't aware of it. #4biddenknowledge reporting live from #TheMatrix. Clip above of from the famous documentary named: #WhatTheBleepDoWeKnow #YouCreateYourOwnReality 🙏🏾⚛👁

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At the beginning of the 19th century, scientists weren’t sure whether light was a wave or a particle. In 1801, Thomas Young (thought he) settled the debate with his double-slit experiment, in which he shined a light through two slits cut into a notecard aimed at a wall. Since he produced a pattern of dark and light bars as opposed to just two slit-shaped patterns, he concluded that light could not be a simple particle.

That said, no one could figure out what medium the wave was traveling through – the substance that made up the universe. Some physicists called it “ether” – matter that could be found everywhere but that wouldn’t interact with its physical counterpart at all.

In 1887, physicists Albert Michelson and Edward Morley set out to prove that “ether” only existed to carry light waves.

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In the late nineteenth century when Jules Verne was a success with his novel From the earth to the moon they appeared two geniuses that would change the way we see the universe with one of the most brilliant physics experiments the Michelson-Morley experiment revealing one of the most paradoxical mysteries of light, at the end Albert Einstein raise his famous theory based on the results of this experiment taking almost all the credit and collapsed 200 years of domination by Newton, establishing the boundary between classical physics and modern physics . That's why I consider one of the turning points in the history of science of humanity.#michelsonandmorley #physics #universe #astronomy #geniuses #xix #light #math #brilliantminds

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Let’s start here – with ether “wind.”

Just like when you’re driving a car and stick your hand out the window, the “ether” should be flowing over the planet’s surface at rate similar to the speed of Earth traveling through space.

Michelson and Morley built a device called an interferometer, which uses what amounts to a one-way mirror to split a beam of light, reflecting half of it at a 90-degree angle down one tunnel and allowing the other half to pass through down another tunnel.

Then, both light beams are reflected against mirrors again, placed at the end of each tunnel, and at the end, the beams are measured by a detector.

Fun fact: advanced versions of their devices were used to detect gravitational waves for the first time back in 2015.

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Researchers are preparing to scrutinize nature at tiny scales by stretching supercooled atoms into room-length waves as they drop them down a 100-meter vacuum tube. By exploiting the atoms' wavelike properties, the experiment will look for ripples in the bizarre quantum realm: potential fingerprints of missing dark matter and, in future iterations, new frequencies of gravitational waves. Collaborators from eight institutions have come together to turn an Illinois mine shaft into the world's largest atom interferometer—the Matter-wave Atomic Gradiometer Interferometric Sensor, or MAGIS-100. Read more: https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/new-instrument-will-stretch-atoms-into-giant-waves/ #VacuumVolume #MAGIS #MAGIS100 #vacuumchamber #vacuumtube #vacuumtech #vacuumscience #vacuumtechnology #interferometer #atomic #atomicresearch #supercooledatoms #atoms #quantumrealm #quantumphysics #quantummechanics #submicroscopic #strontium #darkmatter #gravitationalwaves

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If Michelson and Morley were correct about ether, then they would have traveled at slightly different rates, striking the detector at slightly different times. In reality, though, they arrived together.

With the benefit of hindsight, we know that the experiment failed because there is no ether – and that light is both a wave and a particle that always travels at the same speed no matter the direction.

In their failure, Michelson and Morley laid the groundwork for basically all of the 20th century’s most influential scientific thinkers. Their failure to detect ether presented a new and exciting problem for physicists and other scientists to tackle – and solve – in the years to come.

So the next time something doesn’t work out the way you thought, take heart – this is solid proof that we can always learn at least as much from our failures as our successes.

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